Author Topic: Tolkien poetry - The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun  (Read 21332 times)

Offline Paul

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Re: Tolkien poetry - The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun
« Reply #45 on: May 07, 2009, 03:21:05 PM »
Yeah.. I wanna read it again when I finish LOTR. I'm in the part where the orcs find Frodo's poisoned body by Shelob. Have ya noticed it's in TTT in the book? But that was in the end of the ROTK film.. :huh:
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Offline robwootton

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Re: Tolkien poetry - The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun
« Reply #46 on: May 07, 2009, 04:26:03 PM »
^Yes . There were a few changes.

Offline Paul

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Re: Tolkien poetry - The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun
« Reply #47 on: May 07, 2009, 05:46:39 PM »
What's your fave moment in the book?
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Offline robwootton

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Re: Tolkien poetry - The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun
« Reply #48 on: June 20, 2009, 02:54:15 PM »
Part of a very positive review..

                                      Tolkien believed that these ancient legends drew on a deep background familiar to their readers or listeners and that each author put an individual stamp on his own account. He wrote his lays in the spirit of the original Eddas, channeling their "almost demonic energy." "To hit you in the eye was the deliberate intention of the Norse poet. [He] aims at . . . striking a blow that will be remembered, illuminating a moment with a flash of lightning."

There are many such lightning strikes here, especially in "The Lay of Gudrun," which has passages that recall the hair-raising siege of Helm's Deep in "The Lord of the Rings."

The Lay Of Gundrun seems to get praised the most, by most reviews I've read.  :)  :)